Russia and the West under Lenin and Stalin

  • Title: Russia and the West under Lenin and Stalin
  • Author: George F. Kennan
  • ISBN: 9780451624604
  • Page: 239
  • Format: Paperback
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    • » Russia and the West under Lenin and Stalin ✓ George F. Kennan
      239George F. Kennan
    Russia and the West under Lenin and Stalin

    About George F. Kennan


    1. From George Frost Kennan February 16, 1904 March 17, 2005 was an American advisor, diplomat, political scientist, and historian, best known as the father of containment and as a key figure in the emergence of the Cold War He later wrote standard histories of the relations between Russia and the Western powers.In the late 1940s, his writings inspired the Truman Doctrine and the U.S foreign policy of containing the Soviet Union, thrusting him into a lifelong role as a leading authority on the Cold War His Long Telegram from Moscow in 1946, and the subsequent 1947 article The Sources of Soviet Conduct argued that the Soviet regime was inherently expansionist and that its influence had to be contained in areas of vital strategic importance to the United States These texts quickly emerged as foundational texts of the Cold War, expressing the Truman administration s new anti Soviet Union policy Kennan also played a leading role in the development of definitive Cold War programs and institutions, most notably the Marshall Plan.Shortly after the diploma had been enshrined as official U.S policy, Kennan began to criticize the policies that he had seemingly helped launch By mid 1948, he was convinced that the situation in Western Europe had improved to the point where negotiations could be initiated with Moscow The suggestion did not resonate within the Truman administration, and Kennan s influence was increasingly marginalized particularly after Dean Acheson was appointed Secretary of State in 1949 As U.S Cold War strategy assumed a aggressive and militaristic tone, Kennan bemoaned what he called a misinterpretation of his thinking.In 1950, Kennan left the Department of State, except for two brief ambassadorial stints in Moscow and Yugoslavia, and became a leading realist critic of U.S foreign policy He continued to be a leading thinker in international affairs as a faculty member of the Institute for Advanced Study from 1956 until his death at age 101 in March 2005.


    308 Comments


    1. Kennan was the foremost American authority on Russian history and culture As a college student, he traveled in Russia during the Civil war there and was later posted in the U.S Embassy in Moscow, serving Ambassador Averell Harriman His view of the USSR and containment were rejected by hardliners in the Truman administration after June 1950, but history has mostly vindicated Kennan s opinions on the Soviet Union He was instrumental in creating counter propaganda for the U.S government after Korea [...]

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    2. I first read Kennan s book as an undergrad at the University of Virginia, and then used it in a course on the history of Soviet foreign policy which I was a T.A for at Stanford Essential, and written by an elegant writer, which made it easier for college students Also worked in the Long Telegram, X article, etc.

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    3. The best cold war era coverage of the US mind and attitudes toward Lenin, etc from Archangelsk onward A must read in the bilateral history important than Acheson, et al.

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    4. One of the architects of the cold war, a book I read in the Robert Strauz Hupe s great course in international politics He once referred to a Russian census but said that the numbers could not be relied on I rather naively asked how a national census could be wrong, thinking it was not so difficult to count people and census takers had a lot of experience with this He looked at me rather sternly and then recalled that Stalin did not like the numbers in a census in the 1930 s and as a result had [...]

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    5. This book is based on George Kennan s 1950s Harvard and Oxford lecture notes He a leading authority on Russian history and policy He is also the father of the US Soviet Cold War containment strategy, a two time Pulitzer prize winner, and highly involved in crafting the Marshall Plan as well as the Truman Doctrine His book on Lenin and Stalin is a classic and well worth reading by people interested in Russian history and current Ukraine policy options.

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    6. A must read if you re at all interested in 20th century history, and nowhere near as dry and dusty as you might anticipate.

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    7. Note to self Copy from A.

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