The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America

  • Title: The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America
  • Author: Mae M. Ngai
  • ISBN: 9780618651160
  • Page: 199
  • Format: Hardcover
  • [PDF] Read ó The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America : by Mae M. Ngai - The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America, The Lucky Ones One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America If you re Irish American or African American or Eastern European Jewish American there s a rich literature to give you a sense of your family s arrival in America story Until now that hasn t been th
    [PDF] Read ó The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America : by Mae M. Ngai - The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America, The Lucky Ones One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America If you re Irish American or African American or Eastern European Jewish American there s a rich literature to give you a sense of your family s arrival in America story Until now that hasn t been th

    • [PDF] Read ó The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America : by Mae M. Ngai
      199Mae M. Ngai
    The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America

    About Mae M. Ngai


    1. Mae Ngai is a professor of Asian American Studies and History at Columbia University.


    725 Comments


    1. The Lucky Ones is essentially a historical account of the Chinese Americans in California The book features one family in particular, the Tapes of Russell Street in San Francisco who were among the first middle class Chinese American families in that area If you are not familiar with the history of California, Chinese labours came to this state firstly during the gold rush in the 1840 s as a cheap, abundant source of labour However when the gold rush era panned out, large numbers began to come i [...]

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    2. I throughly enjoyed this book, but know that any review I write won t match up to the The Wall Street Journal s review You can find it here onlinej article SB10001.

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    3. Mae Ngai s The Lucky Ones describes the formation of Chinese America, especially focusing on the life of Jeu Dip, a Chinese immigrant who came to America for a new beginning This book is set in San Francisco, California during the late 1800s, when immigrants began pouring in from all over the world in search of new opportunities and freedom Living in the midst of a new form of discrimination, Jeu Dip and his family must try to live a normal, Americanized life while dodging the anti Chinese and i [...]

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    4. This story of Joseph and Mary Tape to use their American names and their family is one that we rarely hear how the Chinese came to America and became part of our country s melting pot We ve all heard about coolie labor during the gold rush and the building of the railroad, or those Chinese prostitutes, but what about the others The vast majority that weren t either, but wanted to have what Euro Americans had The Tapes may not have been unique, but their story does illustrate this chapter in our [...]

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    5. A history totally devoid of human interest, vivid setting, or substantive analysis The story of Chinese immigrants to America has plenty of potential that has often been recognized in other books, but this read like a jr high social studies report The Tape family isn t cast as representative of the Chinese immigrant experience, but neither are they given any qualities that might explain why their story might be worth telling.And it doesn t seem to be this is marriage after marriage, journey afte [...]

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    6. I had a lot of problems with the way this book was written I think Ngai really chose the wrong project with The Lucky Ones She clearly did her research, but it s also clear that there was not enough material available to write an entire 230 page biography of the Tape family Ngai could have written a good, fairly long essay with the material she had, or perhaps a fictionalized novel, but her final product feels neither historically robust or engaging.Some of the information Ngai includes is factu [...]

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    7. I raced through this one Historian Ngai has a wonderful ability to mix family history with a social history of San Francisco, and later Portland, Oregon, from the 1870s onward, using three generations of a Chinese American family to highlight immigrant experiences, but also social s of the period, the tribulations of the 1906 earthquake and fire, anti Chinese sentiment, opportunities for economic success, family ties and family black sheep, the connection between various world s fairs and the im [...]

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    8. To be rich is glorious.Swimming upstream is the fate of any new immigrant and especially to those of colour Ambition is one thing, but how you achieve success is another The Tape family had the advantage of being early immigrants to California and they took full advantage of their luck The only ethical system at work seems to be centered around the family unit Getting ahead and making good business decisions still rings true in much of the U.S and now in mainland China I don t know if it builds [...]

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    9. The books is very informative about how one Chinese American family overcame the status that plague most Chinese immigrants.

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    10. The Lucky Ones by Mae Ngai, on sale by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on September 15, 2010, 304 pages.Written by a historian and with ten years of research in the making , The Lucky Ones none the less does not read like a boring tract The protagonists primarily the Chinese American Tape family come alive on the page, despite the fact that author Mae Ngai had mostly photographs no diaries and court records from which to determine their characters This book is a first, the story of two self made Chine [...]

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    11. The Lucky Ones, by Columbia history professor Mae Ngai, is the intergenerational story of the Chinese American Tape family It chronicles their story from the immigration of family founders Joseph and Mary through their service in World War II and their acceptance as Chinese Americans The Tapes were responsible for many civil rights firsts that many Americans, and many Chinese Americans, may not be aware of These include the fact that American born children of Chinese descent were not allowed to [...]

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    12. Thank you to FirstReads and the publisher for providing an advanced reading copy The Lucky Ones is a narrative of the life of the Tapes, a Chinese American family that initially set foot in San Francisco and then settled in Berkeley, CA Although there were many Chinese that immigrated to San Francisco in the late 1800s, what made the story of the Tape family unique was 1 their desire to fully integrate themselves into American culture and society, and being amongst the first Chinese Americans to [...]

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    13. ARC received from the First Reads program.The story of the Tape family is not one to read if you re looking to learn about the experience of the typical Chinese immigrant or Chinese American family during the exclusion era Unless you re looking for a family that proves to be the exception to the rule.This history of Joseph Tape and his family spans about 100 years, from the 1860s to the 1960s Tape and his family carved out a name and role for themselves as culture brokers the link between recen [...]

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    14. I ve been reading a ton about Chinese immigration This book was intriguing and valuable as it followed one atypical Bay area family over three generations The Tape family were far prosperous than most Chinese immigrants of the 1800 s In a sense they were among the first self identified Chinese Americans and their life history helped establish the possibility of that ethnicity The American born daughter was the plaintiff in the landmark case petitioning for public school education for Chinese Th [...]

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    15. This is a very interesting book about Chinese immigration The book is centered around Joseph Tape, whose Chinese name was Jeu Dip He comes to San Francisco alone at the age of 12 The story relays his struggle to find a job and make a life for himself here in America He marries another Chinese immigrant, Mary McGladery, in 1875 and they raise their family in the San Francisco area The book deals with the trials and triumphs that the family faces in establishing themselves in the Chinese American [...]

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    16. The story of how this family adapted to American life from the 1860s to the 1950s is remarkable and unexpected While the story doesn t flow as easily as a memoir or narrative fiction, I appreciate that adherence to stick to the facts The author compensates for unknowns by filling in the gaps with historical data, such as loosely quoted Perhaps Joseph did ___ as many other ___ did during this period of time The obviously meticulous research subtly poses serious questions about politics and psycho [...]

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    17. A very readable and informative presentation of generally unknown aspects of a landmark case Tape vs Hurley in San Francisco in the late 1890s regarding exclusion of a Chinese girl, Mamie Tape, from public schools Ngai searched archives and unearthed information that gives a detailed understanding of Mamie s parents and their privileged status as middle class Chinese who both helped and exploited laborer class Chinese immigrants Her father and brother benefited as middle men interpreters and tr [...]

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    18. I found this book very interesting The author follows a Chinese born family from the first immigration of the parents separate immigrants who did not meet until they were both already ensconced in San Francisco through several generations She uses their history as a jumping off point to explore the history of Chinese immigration on the West Coast The difference in this case is that the family that she follows successfully navigated the waters of a very hostile environment this was the the time o [...]

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    19. A neat chronicle of a middle class Chinese American family during the exclusion era However, the topic that drew me to this book, Tape v Hurley gets only a short chapter The major theme of this piece is to shine a light into the middle class, Chinese American Tape family The Tapes dealt with many of the same issues that contemporary Chinese Americans face in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.It s very refreshing to read new scholarship on exclusion era Chinese American beyond the [...]

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    20. Ngai weaves her extensive historical research of a Chinese American family into the fabric of the changing social landscape from the mid nineteenth century all the way to the Civil Rights era of the 1960s I especially love the description of China Villages at several international expositions in the U.S, focusing on the role of Chinese American as cultural brokers between the Chinese working class and upper class whites Most valuable is that Ngai explores the immersion of a Chinese American midd [...]

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    21. Liked learning about the historical context of the Chinese Exclusion era esp the scenes of SF Chinatown and Berkeley in their early days Tried imagining my great grandfather in the mix While I understand the author s limitations in research no written records of the Tape family I would have preferred this to read as historical fiction only to make the story a bit exciting I feel that the lack of documents made me have to trust the author to much to fill in blanks the best she could and since I [...]

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    22. An interesting story used as a framework from which to examine the experience of Chinese Americans, as well as to think about the nature of the middle class Ngai does a good job with what she has, but this book suffers from a lack of available sources Certain things rely on conjecture, and Ngai ascribes personality traits to various members of the Tape family that could have been better supported by quotes Still, a thoughtful study of an underexamined subject.

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    23. Ngai does a good job with outlining the history of Chinese immigrants in general and focuses on three generations of the Tape family With limited documentation, the author had to rely on assumptions and there were a lot of perhaps he did such and such or he might have At times the writing leaned a little too academic for me I would have liked perhaps a bit shorter book with the characters highlighted rather than straying a tad off topic to overly detailed events of the time.

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    24. Wonderful insightful, book about a Chinese American family in San Francisco was instrumental in developing Chinese American culture Through insisting their children be allowed to attend public school, they had to settle for segregated ones the father worked to translate for those entering at angel island, the mother became a photographer of San Franciscan life loved it

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    25. This is a Firstreads win It is always a thrill to win an interesting book I am most appreciative to all who offer these books I love history historical fiction historical setting stories This will be a most interesting addition to knowing about a culture I m not familiar with Thank you

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    26. This is an intriquing story that follows the trials and tribulations of a family determined to rise against the odds It s very well done and I am now sharing it with a neighbor whom I thought would enjoy it.

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    27. What a great story I was not very aware of the Chinese immigration to the US and found this very intriguing Highly recommend.

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    28. Did not enjoy this very much But it was an interesting read

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