The Shaman's Coat: A Native History of Siberia

  • Title: The Shaman's Coat: A Native History of Siberia
  • Author: Anna Reid
  • ISBN: 9780802776761
  • Page: 291
  • Format: Paperback
  • Unlimited The Shaman's Coat: A Native History of Siberia - by Anna Reid - The Shaman's Coat: A Native History of Siberia, The Shaman s Coat A Native History of Siberia The fascinating history of an unknown peopleA vivid mixture of history and reporting The Shaman s Coat tells the story of some of the world s least known peoples the indigenous tribes of Siberia Russ
    Unlimited The Shaman's Coat: A Native History of Siberia - by Anna Reid - The Shaman's Coat: A Native History of Siberia, The Shaman s Coat A Native History of Siberia The fascinating history of an unknown peopleA vivid mixture of history and reporting The Shaman s Coat tells the story of some of the world s least known peoples the indigenous tribes of Siberia Russ

    • Unlimited The Shaman's Coat: A Native History of Siberia - by Anna Reid
      291Anna Reid
    The Shaman's Coat: A Native History of Siberia

    About Anna Reid


    1. Anna Reid Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Shaman's Coat: A Native History of Siberia book, this is one of the most wanted Anna Reid author readers around the world.


    621 Comments


    1. Not what I expected I expected of an oral history The author travelling throughout Siberia and recording the stories of the Shaman There was some of this The author did travel Siberia and talk to a few people about Shamanism, but it was few and far between The pages were filled with history, eg Stalin, Gulag, philosophers quotes, quotes from Russian literature and about Russian authors etc and at times it felt like the author had lost her way Lost her vision of what this book was supposed to be [...]

      Reply

    2. 3.5 starsA curious, sometimes jumbled mix of anthropology, travel diary, history of indigenous groups in Siberia I found much of the information interesting if mostly depressing it helps to have than passing knowledge of Russian Soviet history when reading this book.Even though I am much familiar with North America s indigenous groups their history in relation to European North American colonization, I had never given much thought to similar groups throughout Siberia In some ways, there is muc [...]

      Reply

    3. I had hoped for information about traditional Siberian shamanism from the text because of its title but was not disappointed by the mix of history, travelogue and anthropological information I found there It is a depressing read, since traditional Siberian peoples were variously assaulted by invading Russians, Christians and capitalists until their unique cultural and linguistic heritages were all but scrubbed from the Siberian landscape Reid concludes the book by writing that the traditional p [...]

      Reply

    4. Given the topic, it may be appropriate that this book is sad and thin Like indigenous peoples all over the world, the natives of Siberia were steamrollered by the cruelties of the modern age Unlike indigenous peoples elsewhere, however, there seem to be few people, in the country where the various indigenous Siberians now find themselves, who feel at all regretful or wish to record the recollections of the final witnesses to their ancient way of life Whenever I see a person of European descent a [...]

      Reply

    5. The title is a bit misleading It is a book about the various native tribes who live in Siberia There is a touch of discussion on Shamans But the real interest was finding out how many different tribes and cultures lived and are still trying to live in Siberia These people made the book worthwhile to read but not a great book to read.

      Reply

    6. Hay un poco de todo historia, antropolog a, investigaci n y diario de viaje Una brit nica viaja por Siberia en busca de los pueblos ind genas, aunque a lo largo de sus p ginas reconoce sus limitaciones dispone de poco tiempo varios meses para un territorio enorme , medios escasos y solo entra en contacto con nueve de las treinta y tantas nacionalidades siberianas En algunos casos, apenas mantiene una charla breve y poco informativa con uno o dos nativos de determinado pueblo, muchas veces bastan [...]

      Reply

    7. Inspired to learn something about Siberia after rewatching a favorite movie, Dersu Usala, I somewhat randomly chose this book It turned out to be well written, with a knowing but not cynical, poetic but not effusive tone, and it contains useful maps of the various regions that comprise the chapters of the book The title and impressive cover art are a bit misleading, however The book really focuses on the diverse ways that the native tribes were decimated or deracinated There is relatively little [...]

      Reply

    8. Dated and of a quick travelogue than I had hoped, this still is an eye opener for anyone curious about Siberia, Russian conquest, and how things have been going since the collapse of the Soviet Union Sad to say, none too well for the indigenous peoples from the Urals to the Pacific Anyone familiar with the Wild West history of the U.S will recognize many similarities with the eastward conquests, some differences, and current affairs that can be strikingly similar Moscow still seems amazingly di [...]

      Reply

    9. This book was entertaining, included a lot of cool anecdotes, described interesting encounters with Siberians, and provided a good overview of the history of Siberia But based on the other reading about Siberia I d been doing, some of which dealt with the same modern issues and phenomena, I thought it was weaker and less insightful I would probably not trust any conclusions that it drew about Siberian identity or Soviet influence without verifying them elsewhere Also, a lot of things were really [...]

      Reply

    10. I very much enjoyed this itinerant history of Siberia by Russian Studies scholar and journalist Anna Reid It is far from a complete history of Siberia Reid talks to representatives of 9 of Siberia s 30 plus ethnic groups, so there s a lot of ground left uncovered But as a combination of general introduction, cultural history and travelogue, it s beautifully written and incredibly enjoyable.

      Reply

    11. More like the history of the effect European encroachment had on the native peoples of Siberia Very similar in theme to the effect European encroachment had on the native peoples of the Americas Interesting but depressing.

      Reply

    12. Going to shamelessly use my review that I wrote for class because, honestly, it s a good one.The Shaman s Coat A Native History of Siberia, by Anna Reid, 2002 Great Britain Orion Publishing Group Ltd ISBN 0 297 64377 0 hardcover xiii 225, 9 maps, 29 pictures, acknowledgments, introduction, afterward, notes, selected bibliography, index.Reviewed by C Andrews The Shaman s Coat is an extensively written ethnography detailing the Siberian indigenes and their world Despite what the title may suggest, [...]

      Reply

    13. A difficult read I lacked the prior knowledge that would have made this satisfying and meaningful.

      Reply

    14. 3 not meant to be a downer like the Internet seems to consider anything less than 5 , without checking what their stars are supposed to mean , but per the 3 tooltip liked it.It was very readable, which was an achievement given the tale of misery exploitative Russians, then brutal Communists and finally, post 1990, disinterested capitalists, inflicted on the peoples of the lands between the Urals and the Bering Straits I m very glad I read it.I would have liked it if Ms Reid had been able to fin [...]

      Reply

    15. Interesting book and well worth reading as an introduction to the peoples of Siberia That said I found it a little bit neither one thing nor the other First, as so often, the title is quite misleading very little of the content is concerned with the life and or working of Siberian shamans It s none the worse for that of course, but all the same it is a bit like buying a box of washing powder and finding it contains mostly dishwasher tablets instead Almost the same but not quite.My other, centra [...]

      Reply

    16. The Times had some new world maps in a feature by Frank Jacobs the other day In one he re imagined Siberia, pulling away from Russia and merging into China It makes sense in a lot of ways, but Russia has also penetrated and mangled Siberia to the point that no single representation seems possible for most of its inhabitants.Wait isn t that Russia s MO everywhere Anna Reid traveled through Siberia in the 1990 s looking for native shamans and their cultural remains What she found was a sad sad pla [...]

      Reply

    17. Part travel book, part popular history, part journalism this is a useful skim across the surface of the Russian colonisation occupation of Siberia beginning in the mid 16th century and a useful pointer to the current uneven but mainly parlous situation of Siberia s indigenous peoples Although Reid has a tendency to highlight the grim effects of the Stalin era on many indigenous groups, she does not fall into the trap of blaming their dispossession on Soviet era politics although she does note th [...]

      Reply

    18. Despite spending a stretch a couple of years ago reading all kinds of books on Russian history, most of the place names I could name in the Asian part of Russia were learned off a Risk board The conquest of Siberia, one twelfth of the world s landmass, by Russians from the European side of the Ural Mountains was lucky to get a couple of paragraphs in those tomes A partial fix for that is found in The Shaman s Coat by Anna Reid, who journeyed across Siberia to see the homelands of some of the nat [...]

      Reply

    19. A good overview of the interactions between Russia and the native Siberians over several centuries While it didn t go into too much detail on the lives and traditions of different native groups, it did give a general understanding of different lifestyles and identities, as well as individual attitudes, opinions and reactions from people of all sides It was a good primer and now I d like to go into detail on each group The book is well sourced, a rich bibliography that merits exploration on its [...]

      Reply

    20. This text verifies everything Professors Patton and Polsky told me, and some of what Svetlana Anatolyevna and Doctors Speh and Chien said, as well I wasn t really aware of the Sakhalin debate or rather, I was, from my teenage Japanese study, but it never seemed too important See, an island very close to Siberia is claimed by both Russia and Japan Now I ve seen neutral bias towards both sides.Eastern Asia has been possibly my longest sustained interest, that, oboe, maybe passive ornithology DINOS [...]

      Reply

    21. Reid provides a good bit of background for a survey of a tragically familiar history of indigenous peoples experiencing the tides of European expansion The results of her own travels and inquiries seem thin and disappointing, though possibly because they reflect such greatly diminished cultures among the tribal people she visits One thing I would recommend to readers lacking much familiarity with Siberia is to read a good general history such as Benson Bobrick s East of the Sun before reading Re [...]

      Reply

    22. What can I say I loved learning about the various tribes, the Small Peoples of the North of Siberia Anna Reid addresses shamanism and all aspects of the current, post glasnost lives of eight native Siberian tribes, as well as their histories, and how they were conquered or not by the czarist, bolshevik, and soviet regimes While Ms Reid, a former writer for The Economist, certainly knows how to throw the statistics around, she ably keeps them at bay in this book, and lets the stories of some of [...]

      Reply

    23. This book was in dire need of an editor Firstly, it has almost nothing to do with native shamanism The author writes about subjects and uses words often foreign and phrases that routinely would require footnotes or explanations, yet none are given Even with my above average interest in anthropology and the ethnicities and languages of East Russia, I found it a bit difficult to get through, especially the overdrawn histories of each region An index of pictures or better maps would help a lot too. [...]

      Reply

    24. Great Anna Reid blends generous slices of Siberian, Asian Russian history anthropology with smaller servings of European American history anthropology in the adventurous tour through Siberia The book gave me such a feeling of wanderlust I wanted to take a similar trip to explore the World the way Anna Reid has done in this book I recommend this book to anyone who think Siberian Russian There are many parallels between how the Russian Gov t treated Siberian Tribes how the the US Gov t treated Nat [...]

      Reply

    25. It s a history of the destruction of native Siberian culture by Tzarist and Soviet Russian and the author s search through modern Siberia for the remaining native subcultures or as the Ruusians apparently call them, Small Numbered Peoples of which she finds the usual story of loss of language, destruction of artifacts and culture, loss of traditional homeland, and assimilation through education The names are of course different, but it s not a different or new story from the American West It fe [...]

      Reply

    26. A fascinating, informative, and witty history of Siberian tribes and culture and the devastation they suffered under Russian colonialism, which was very similar to that suffered by Native American tribes under U.S colonialism including disease decimation not too surprising since they share DNA Anyone interested in indigenous groups would find this book a valuable addition to their store of knowledge it really put Siberia on the map, for me.

      Reply

    27. Part travelogue, part colonial history, part anthropology, this book covers cultures that I certainly did not know anything about, so just because of that I enjoyed the book However, while the organization is clear geographical , the organization of the individual chapters becomes repetitive because of the similar stories and the rather slim evidence The quest for shamans is, unfortunately, rather unsuccessful.

      Reply

    28. An interesting history, about Russia s expansion east in some ways comparable to the westward expansion of the USA than shamanism per se, and full of interesting accounts of such peoples as the Buryat, the Tuvans, and the Sakha The history can be gruesome in places, but the writing is excellent.

      Reply

    29. More of a travelogue than ethnography Parachute ethnography, maybe Deserves credit for being broad in scope, but naturally can t get very in depth as it is quite short, only 202 pages Bibliography is nice.

      Reply

    30. An engrossing introduction to the indigenous peoples of Siberia and their history with various colonization from tsarist to stalinist to post soviet I took a trip on the trans siberian which was immeasurably enriched by reading this book.

      Reply

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *