The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott

  • Title: The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott
  • Author: Louisa May Alcott Daniel Shealy Madeleine B. Stern
  • ISBN: 9780806516547
  • Page: 233
  • Format: Paperback
  • Free Read The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott - by Louisa May Alcott Daniel Shealy Madeleine B. Stern - The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott, The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott From the author of anonymous and pseudonymous tales comes a collection on nine newly discovered stories uncovered by tireless literary detective work
    Free Read The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott - by Louisa May Alcott Daniel Shealy Madeleine B. Stern - The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott, The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott From the author of anonymous and pseudonymous tales comes a collection on nine newly discovered stories uncovered by tireless literary detective work

    • Free Read The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott - by Louisa May Alcott Daniel Shealy Madeleine B. Stern
      233Louisa May Alcott Daniel Shealy Madeleine B. Stern
    The Lost Stories Of Louisa May Alcott

    About Louisa May Alcott Daniel Shealy Madeleine B. Stern


    1. As A.M Barnard Behind a Mask, or a Woman s Power 1866 The Abbot s Ghost, or Maurice Treherne s Temptation 1867 A Long Fatal Love Chase 1866 first published 1995 First published anonymously A Modern Mephistopheles 1877 Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania on November 29, 1832 She and her three sisters, Anna, Elizabeth and May were educated by their father, philosopher teacher, Bronson Alcott and raised on the practical Christianity of their mother, Abigail May.Louisa spent her childhood in Boston and in Concord, Massachusetts, where her days were enlightened by visits to Ralph Waldo Emerson s library, excursions into nature with Henry David Thoreau and theatricals in the barn at Hillside now Hawthorne s Wayside.Like her character, Jo March in Little Women, young Louisa was a tomboy No boy could be my friend till I had beaten him in a race, she claimed, and no girl if she refused to climb trees, leap fences For Louisa, writing was an early passion She had a rich imagination and often her stories became melodramas that she and her sisters would act out for friends Louisa preferred to play the lurid parts in these plays, the villains, ghosts, bandits, and disdainful queens At age 15, troubled by the poverty that plagued her family, she vowed I will do something by and by Don t care what, teach, sew, act, write, anything to help the family and I ll be rich and famous and happy before I die, see if I won t Confronting a society that offered little opportunity to women seeking employment, Louisa determined I will make a battering ram of my head and make my way through this rough and tumble world Whether as a teacher, seamstress, governess, or household servant, for many years Louisa did any work she could find.Louisa s career as an author began with poetry and short stories that appeared in popular magazines In 1854, when she was 22, her first book Flower Fables was published A milestone along her literary path was Hospital Sketches 1863 based on the letters she had written home from her post as a nurse in Washington, DC as a nurse during the Civil War.When Louisa was 35 years old, her publisher Thomas Niles in Boston asked her to write a book for girls Little Women was written at Orchard House from May to July 1868 The novel is based on Louisa and her sisters coming of age and is set in Civil War New England Jo March was the first American juvenile heroine to act from her own individuality a living, breathing person rather than the idealized stereotype then prevalent in children s fiction.In all, Louisa published over 30 books and collections of stories She died on March 6, 1888, only two days after her father, and is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord.


    641 Comments


    1. Very, very melodramatic That being said these stories are exactly what I ve always imagined Jo March writing So for that reason alone, if you re a fan of Little Women, you might want to give this book a go.

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    2. This week is free eBook week and I capitalize from this by downloading for free the Lost Stories of Louisa May Alcott Louise Alcott is best known for her book Little Women This compilation of stories were originally published anonymously in Frank Leslie s Lady s magazine between 1868 and 1870 They were considered lost until a few literary detectives found them and published them.There are a total of 5 stories on the audio tape These include Countess Berison, Fatal Follies, Fate in a Fan, Which W [...]

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    3. Very different in style from Little Women, These were short stories submitted to a Ladies Magazine under a pseudonym They involve murder, suicide, and revenge, Altho alot milder than what we have today Im sure these stories were quite titillating at the time Enjoyable, if you need a book that can be read when you are busy and only have small blocks of time.

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    4. One of my favorite novels is Little Women , so it was a treat to read these short stories by the author It made me think of Jo March in Little Women , writing her stories in the attic I want to read

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    5. Read the first time sometime in 2006 or so I think.

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    6. This is a collection of stories written by the author for an adult audience She is best known for her childrens books such as Little Women, but here is a collection of stories published in magazines that were written for the enjoyment of adults The treatment of the subject matter reminds me of stories I have read by Guy de Maupassant, where society of the day is examined and found somewhat lacking The stories are as well written as one would expect from reading her novels, and the characters and [...]

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    7. Found this at a bookstore in Louisa May Alcott country i.e Concord, MA Fans of Little Women with all its treacly sweetness and light will not enjoy this book This is high Victorian melodrama here At the end of every story, I heard bum bum BUUUUUMMMMMM Lots of tragic dying and such Last words like, Forgive me, but I loved you, and Go we want no shadow on our happiness Although I m certain Alcott did not intend this to be Grade A Campiness, to a modern reader, that s how it comes off Great fun, if [...]

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    8. There were some good ones, there were some not so good ones Read my upcoming review on Austenitis to learn about what I thought.

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    9. Not your average Louisa May

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    10. Written in the style of her character Jo March s stories, the reflect a young writer, learning her trade, earning story continuity and such Very splashy and fantastic tales.

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    11. Meh All the stories were the same I guess they should have stayed lost

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