Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment

  • Title: Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment
  • Author: Michael Javen Fortner
  • ISBN: 9780674743991
  • Page: 255
  • Format: Hardcover
  • [PDF] Unlimited ñ Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment : by Michael Javen Fortner - Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment, Black Silent Majority The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment Often seen as a political sop to the racial fears of white voters aggressive policing and draconian sentencing for illegal drug possession and related crimes have led to the imprisonment of millions
    [PDF] Unlimited ñ Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment : by Michael Javen Fortner - Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment, Black Silent Majority The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment Often seen as a political sop to the racial fears of white voters aggressive policing and draconian sentencing for illegal drug possession and related crimes have led to the imprisonment of millions

    • [PDF] Unlimited ñ Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment : by Michael Javen Fortner
      255Michael Javen Fortner
    Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment

    About Michael Javen Fortner


    1. Michael Javen Fortner is Assistant Professor and Academic Director of Urban Studies at the Murphy Institute at CUNY SPS In 2010, he received a Ph.D in government and policy from Harvard University At Harvard, he was a doctoral fellow in the multidisciplinary program in inequality and social policy and an affiliate of the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies In Fall 2005, he was a visiting fellow at the Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion at the London School of Economics His work studies the intersection of American political development and political philosophy particularly in the areas of race, ethnicity, and class Along with Amy Bridges, he edited a volume on city politics, Urban Citizenship and American Democracy The Historical and Institutional Roots of Local Politics and Policy SUNY Press, forthcoming He is also the author of Black Silent Majority Urban Politics and the Rockefeller Drug Laws Harvard University Press, forthcoming His articles have appeared in Studies in American Political Development, the Journal of Urban History, and the Journal of Policy History He has been awarded fellowships and grants from the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Aspen Institute, the Center for American Political Studies, the American Political Science Association, the New York State Archives, the Rockefeller Archive Center, and the Mortar Board Honor Society He has also received several teaching awards.


    179 Comments


    1. It is one of the great paradoxes of U.S history that, on the very heels of the Civil Rights movement, the Black community in the US found itself captured by the modern carceral state How is it, scholars ask, that empowerment could be so quickly followed by disenfranchisement Most current theories point to racial tension, economic forces, or some combination of the two to explain this seeming paradox Fortner, however, takes a different view.In Black Silent Majority, Fortner has examined the ways [...]

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    2. A rare book that actually has something original to say about the ongoing tragedy of black white relations in America The story begins in 1940s Harlem when a genuine achievement is underway the development of a black middle class with minimal government involvement It ends in the Harlem of the 1970s when that same class inadvertently contributed to the draconian drug laws that some are now calling a new Jim Crow It is a shame that the black intelligentsia are threatened by Fortner s ideas read D [...]

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    3. To understand the evolution of the indigenous framing of Harlem s drug trade, it is important to juxtapose this cautious optimism with the seemingly inexplicable rise in drug addiction and trafficking Because of the political and economic achievements of the 1940s and 1950s, the force of the white gaze began to wane, and material interests and class based values started to define how Harlemites understood black criminality Because of improved social and political conditions, some were less likel [...]

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    4. The Silent majority is a book that expresses the voice of a Black community in Harlem that became distressed due to high occurrences of crime In the mid twentieth century, media outlets chose to shine attention on Black leaders, such as Stokely Carmichael and Malcolm X, and drown out the voices of the every day working class Black person living in these conditions Drug addicts, drug dealers, robbers and rapists were running amok in Harlem,NY and many Middle Class Blacks were becoming fed up The [...]

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    5. Very interesting topic, but alas the book wasn t as good as I had hoped It s definitely thoroughly researched, but the writing is dryThe writer is not a great storyteller and that s a shame, because the topic and the material certainly could have resulted in some gripping stories And the looooong paragraphs, small type font and crammed pages didn t help either Too bad.

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    6. Interesting premisee responsibility for the drug war and the disproportionate incarceration of minorities specifically black males lies w many different groups It s a history book so it s semi dense but thought provoking.

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